Jupiter - New Observer Toolkit

Jupiter – New Observer Toolkit

Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System, has a retinue of 63 satellites (at last count) and shields Earth from inbound comets. One of it’s moons, Europa, is suspected of haboring an ocean beneath its icy crust, one that has a very good chance of supporting life.

Jupiter is a spectacular planet when seen in a telescope, sporting two prominent cloud bands and its Great Red Spot, a…

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The SWEEPS Field - A Massive Star Survey 
The Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search, or SWEEPS, was a 2006 astronomical survey project using the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel to monitor 180,000 stars for seven days to detect extrasolar planets via the transit method.

The stars that were monitored in this astronomical survey were all located in the Sagittarius-I Window, a rare transparent view to the Milky Way’s central bulge stars in the Sagittarius constellation as our view to most of the galaxy’s central stars is blocked by lanes of dust. These stars in the galaxy’s central bulge region are approximately 27,000 light years from Earth.
Credit: NASA, ESA, W. Clarkson (Indiana University and UCLA), and K. Sahu (STScI)

astronomicalwonders:

The SWEEPS Field - A Massive Star Survey 

The Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search, or SWEEPS, was a 2006 astronomical survey project using the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel to monitor 180,000 stars for seven days to detect extrasolar planets via the transit method.

The stars that were monitored in this astronomical survey were all located in the Sagittarius-I Window, a rare transparent view to the Milky Way’s central bulge stars in the Sagittarius constellation as our view to most of the galaxy’s central stars is blocked by lanes of dust. These stars in the galaxy’s central bulge region are approximately 27,000 light years from Earth.

Credit: NASA, ESA, W. Clarkson (Indiana University and UCLA), and K. Sahu (STScI)